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Now Members Get Nine Courses!

We’re thrilled to announce that our ninth course is ready for viewing or download by members: “Freedom’s Progress: The History of Political Thought, Part I,” by Professor Gerard Casey of University College, Dublin. Check out the topics below! (For our other courses, click here.)

Not yet a member? Our Black Friday promotion — 35% off with coupon code CLASS (all caps) — ends today, December 2, 2013, so click here to join now! Gift subscriptions are also available at the reduced rate.

Now for the course topics:

Pre-and Early History

In the Beginning
Gardens of Eden
Some Early Civilisations
The Emergence of the Ruling Class
What a Piece of Work is Man

Sophists

The Sophists and the Polis
The Sophists on Law and Nature

Plato

The Republic (1)
The Republic (2)
Statesman and Laws

Aristotle

Polis and Slavery
Chrematistics, Economics and Politics
Politics

Slavery

Slavery—Natural or Conventional?
Slavery—Stoic, Jewish and Christian Views

Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy

Epicureanism, Scepticism and Stoicism
Cicero
Seneca and the Roman Lawyers

Christianity

Scriptural Interpretation and Samuel
Romans 13 et al.

Augustine

City of God, City of the Earth
The State as Thieftaker
Augustine—Realpolitik

Early Medieval Thought

After Rome
Slavery, Authority and Justice
The Universities and the Cities
Feudalism and the Law
Kingship and John of Salisbury

Thomas Aquinas

Law
Sources of Political Authority
Sacred and Secular, Tyranny (and an aside on Sir John Fortescue)
Slavery, Property, Usury and Heresy

Marsilius of Padua

Intimations of Modernity
The Defender of the Peace
Valentior Pars

Machiavelli

Christian? Aristotelian?
Machiavellian?

Medieval Economics

Money and Usury
Utility, Value and Price

The Reformation

Wycliffe & Luther
Luther; Radical Reformers
Calvin

Join us!

Give Knowledge, Not Neckties — Plus, 35% Off!

So you know a student who could use a lifeline to sane professors.

Or a liberty lover who craves the truth about history and economics.

Maybe that person is you.

Then you won’t find a better gift, for them or for yourself, than LibertyClassroom.com.

At LibertyClassroom.com, one subscription gets you access to eight courses – and we add more every year. Imagine learning the real thing in courses like these:

  • Constitutional History of the U.S.
  • John Maynard Keynes: His System and Its Fallacies
  • Austrian Economics: Step by Step
  • Introduction to Logic
  • Western Civilization to 1500
  • Western Civilization Since 1500
  • U.S. History to 1877
  • U.S. History Since 1877

Every course is available for download at your convenience, in both video and audio according to your preference. You’ll also find recommended readings, Q&A forums where you can get your questions answered by the experts, and a monthly live Q&A session where faculty take your questions in real time.

Our ninth course, coming in two weeks, is on the history of political thought — it’s called “Freedom’s Progress,” and it’s taught by the great Gerard Casey of University College, Dublin.

Normally, a subscription costs $99 — barely half the price of a single credit hour at a community college, and an outright steal for eight courses.

But with this Black Friday special — now extended through the weekend! — a subscription is only $64!

To grab a gift subscription at this special price, no coupon code is necessary. Simply click here.

To treat yourself to a subscription, use coupon code CLASS (in all caps) at this link.

As Glenn Jacobs, WWE’s Kane, put it: “I’ve learned more in your courses at LibertyClassroom.com than I ever did in high school and college!”

Join thousands of other liberty lovers at LibertyClassroom.com!

Black Friday at Liberty Classroom!

So you know a student who could use a lifeline to sane professors.

Or a liberty lover who craves the truth about history and economics.

Maybe that person is you.

Then you won’t find a better gift, for them or for yourself, than LibertyClassroom.com.

At LibertyClassroom.com, one subscription gets you access to eight courses – and we add more every year. Imagine learning the real thing in courses like these:

  • Constitutional History of the U.S.
  • John Maynard Keynes: His System and Its Fallacies
  • Austrian Economics: Step by Step
  • Introduction to Logic
  • Western Civilization to 1500
  • Western Civilization Since 1500
  • U.S. History to 1877
  • U.S. History Since 1877

Every course is available for download at your convenience, in both video and audio according to your preference. You’ll also find recommended readings, Q&A forums where you can get your questions answered by the experts, and a monthly live Q&A session where faculty take your questions in real time.

Our ninth course, coming in two weeks, is on the history of political thought — it’s called “Freedom’s Progress,” and it’s taught by the great Gerard Casey of University College, Dublin.

Normally, a subscription costs $99 — barely half the price of a single credit hour at a community college, and an outright steal for eight courses.

But with this Black Friday special, a subscription is only $64!

To grab a gift subscription at this special price, no coupon code is necessary. Simply click here.

To treat yourself to a subscription, use coupon code CLASS (in all caps) at this link.

As Glenn Jacobs, WWE’s Kane, put it: “I’ve learned more in your courses at LibertyClassroom.com than I ever did in high school and college!”

Join thousands of other liberty lovers at LibertyClassroom.com!

Bring Your Questions on Economics

Our next live Q&A session will take place tomorrow night (Monday, November 25) at 8:00pm ET for 90 minutes. I’ll be joined by Jeffrey Herbener, our professor of Austrian economics and the department chairman at Grove City College.

Please join us! Just sign in to your account and click “Live Sessions” at the top of the screen. Or, once signed in, simply click on this link. Bring your questions or just come and watch!

The First Americans

Who were the first Americans? Forty years ago, historians, archeologists, and anthropologists would have answered conclusively that the first Americans arrived from Eastern Asia via a land bridge across the Bering Strait around twelve thousand years ago.  These were the Clovis peoples, an early American people essentially discovered by former slave George McJunkin in 1908 after he uncovered a prehistoric bison skeleton and an early stone point in a New Mexico dry river bed.  But things change, and as Liberty Classroom members know, the historical “consensus” is not always accurate.

History takes imagination and a willingness to accept evidence that does not fit the “consensus” position.  Smithsonian historian Dennis J. Stanford has argued for twenty years that the first Americans in fact arrived from either Western Asia or Europe and are closely linked to the ancient Solutrean peoples of France.  He was originally ridiculed, rejected, and marginalized by the profession, but slowly, his position has found favor among academics.  His work may finally be proved by science.

A forthcoming book by Texas A&M press explains that DNA analysis has revealed that the first Americans had more in common genetically with Western Asians or Europeans than Eastern Asians.  If so, history texts will need to be rewritten.  In perhaps another thirty years, the “consensus” may be that the first Americans arrived across ice sheets from Europe, not Asia, and brought with them the “Clovis” technology that has never been found outside of Europe or Western Asia other than in the Americas.  Of course, this will take an open mind.   The historical “profession” is notorious for the opposite, and the Solutrean thesis is rife with political controversy.

While the United States history courses as Liberty Classroom do not cover this subject, I believe this is an important topic and one that our members may find interesting.  Controversy is always fun.  Here is an hour long lecture by Stanford explaining his thesis in detail.  Enjoy!

What our members are saying

Liberty Classroom may end up being the best money I’ve ever spent.

- S.W.

I am incredibly impressed.

- J.W.

Wow! I have always been studious, yet I do not recall learning any of this as a child. I am loving the material.

- R.D.

I now even find myself constantly correcting my own textbooks. This resource is invaluable!

- J.L.

Tom Woods and company should have their heads examined for practically giving away college level lectures on real history.

- Kenn Williamson

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